Design it Yourself

Design It Yourself is an interactive exhibition at the MOTI in Breda. In the exhibition both children and adults are challenged to work as designers. There are different elements for them to design such as: a magazine cover, a stop motion animation, a T-shirt or an icon.

Stop We Have Motion

A race against time to make a stop motion animation with all the moveable elements in the space. A camera positioned above captures the action below.

On The Cover

Again using the moveable objects but this time to make a magazine cover. This larger than life cover even allows the visitor to be part of their design. Similar a camera captures the final design.

Design-O-Mat

This pictogram drawing contest machine works like a slot machine and gives a randomised obscure assignment. For example, “design a pictogram for: a swimming pool, for hamsters, in the desert” or “a parking lot, for annoying people, with humour.”

All the results are published on the Design it Yourself website so the visitor can always check their designs after and share it with friends.


Trapped in Suburbia award

Silver | 2012 International Design Awards
Finalist | 2012 European Design Awards

A book to play with


Ruimte voor de spelende mens

Ruimte voor de spelende mens (Space for the Playing People) presents The Hague’s dream to become a utopian city based on artist Constant Nieuwenhuys’ New Babylon. Here the city is an environment where its inhabitants can focus solely on their creativity and exist as homo ludens, ‘playing man’.

This financial report documents the cultural budget distribution across the many institutions in The Hague. The document details the government’s spending for the following four years in comparison to previous.

Fulfilling the city’s dream, the design of the report actually gives the reader the opportunity to play. The content is divided into seven books which form a tangram puzzle. ‘Alles moet mogelijk blijven, alles moet kunnen gebeuren’ (Everything must remain possible, everything can happen), the report’s ethos, is emphasised through the tangram’s ability to form infinite combinations.

As a tangram puzzle the previously dry and complex document is transformed into one of creativity and joy. Additionally, the shapes of the tangram become an abstraction of The Hague’s visual identity of which the report is designed within.