Hebbes!

Museum Gouda was one of the few museums in the world to take the first steps towards liberating their historic collections as 3D scans for all to view. Hebbes! (Gotcha) is a space within the museum dedicated to presenting the now digitalised collection.

A display inside the room allows the visitor to select an item from the collection. Then using a small cube the visitor can rotate the scanned item to view it in 360° on a large 3D holographic screen.

Auto Play

This interactive installation part of Graphic Design Festival Breda 2015 is a series of Sound Posters that respond to passing movement. Displayed in the 3sec.gallery, an exhibition space along the entrance of a parking garage, the viewer can have only three seconds to drive past and view the posters.

Each of the twenty-five posters react to passing cars, cyclists and pedestrians producing individual sound bites that when heard together form a composition. In collaboration with Koen Herfst (drummer to Armin van Buuren among others) this installation forms an experimental interplay between analogue and digital, picture and sound.

XXS Dutch Design

Stamp design is a very rich tradition in Dutch design so much so stamps are seen as miniature works of art. They cover all kinds of subjects and tell all sorts of stories. They capture the world on a tiny piece of paper. In XXS Dutch Design visitors step into this world immersing themselves in a sea of 1,200 larger than life stamps.

The exhibition showed the stamp design process with the work of Dick Bruna, Irma Boom, de Designpolitie, Rineke Dijkstra, Joost Swarte, Anton Corbijn and Studio Job. The latest royal stamp was also presented for the first time with the exhibition being opened by King Willem Alexander himself.

Additional photos by Fred Ernst


Trapped in Suburbia award

Silver | 2014 European Design Awards
Silver | 2014 International Design Awards

On The Road – Travelling with the Photographer

How can photography be experienced in a new way? On The Road – Travelling with the Photographer marks the first in a series of exhibitions showcasing the Nationaal Archief’s photography collection of over 14 million images. The selection is a journey through history showing the prominence of travel in the development of photography.

This exhibition contains several unique ways to experience the collection. Upon entering, the Infinity Room places photography in the current day, precisely the current second. The room is completely covered from floor to ceiling with images streamed from the web highlighting the saturation of photography today.

Apposing this fast paced world, two unique photo chairs offer the visitor an opportunity to sit, observe and truly appreciate one single photo. They can even close the surrounding curtain to enhance the privacy and peace and quiet of the moment.

The majority of the exhibition contains black and white photography. The Colour Room, however, presents a selection of colour photos in a completely different atmosphere. You are transported into a different world just as colour photography did at its arrival.

Since this is the first in a series of exhibitions, the entire structural design is a modular system that can be easily deconstructed and rebuilt in different layouts for future exhibits. Also, especially for this exhibition a new hanging system was devised to reduce preparation time by 80%.

Exhibited renowned international photographers included: Ed van der Elsken, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Capa, Luc Timmers, Herbert Ponting, Cas Oorthuys, Sem Presser and Willem van de Poll.

Additional photos by Anne Reitsma.

Silent Helpers – 100 Years of Cordaid

This travelling exhibition shows that you need not be a Mandela to be a good person. Doing something good for others can be simple and may not always obvious or even recognised. Cordaid believes there exists a silent helper in everyone. Within homes live silent helpers and behind each door is an interesting story to tell.

The exhibition is made up of four parts:

The Status Quo

Cordaid see sharing as the easiest way to help others. Using red balls, visitors of the exhibition can answer the question “Wat deel jij?” (What do you share?). During the exhibition their answers contribute to a growing interactive infographic.

Meet the Silent Helpers

Behind every door the story of a silent helper is told through video and print.

The History of Cordaid

On the outside of the houses the visitor can read about the 100 years of Cordaid.

I Want to Share This With You

An analogue version of the ditwilikmetjedelen.nl website, this wall shares many stories of silent helpers and as more stories are published online the wall grows with it.

Silent Helpers – 100 Years of Cordaid travelled throughout the Netherlands and to make this an easy and efficient process each element of the construction fits the size of a standard palette. Meaning the complete exhibition can be quickly condensed into one lorry.

Weer Toekomst!

This travelling exhibition presents the story of refugee integration through the photographs of Ahmet Polat, Dutch photography laureate of 2015. The exhibition travels throughout the Netherlands to various venues including museums and universities, consequently the design is formed from a collection of installations able to adapt to the different environments. The various panels present photos, written stories and recorded interviews of each refugee.

An important part of the exhibition is the calendar wall. Each calendar represents one year in the life of a refugee while staying in the Netherlands. The sheets of each calendar can be torn off and taken home to create a do-it-yourself exhibition.   

Polat followed several students of UAF, the Foundation for Refugee Students who support highly skilled refugees in the Netherlands by helping with their study and transferring their existing qualifications into acknowledged Dutch ones. The photographs and accompanying stories capture the process of integration for these various individuals and document their new future in the Netherlands.

The name Weer Toekomst sheds a positive light on the new futures for these individuals, especially when ‘future’ can be an uncertainty for refugees.

Cover! – 85 Years of VPRO Gids Covers

Cover! marks 85 years of VPRO Gids, the television guide of Dutch broadcast station VPRO. This particular broadcast station has played a crucial part in Dutch design history with the guide being a focal point.

This exhibition at the Museum of the Image in Breda was a tribute to this magnificent series of publications. The VPRO were one of the early commissioners of talented designers and artists to design their covers.

Torture Basement

The redesign of the torture exhibit in Museum Gouda focused on capturing the imagination and curiosity children had when entering but also making it exciting and informative. Translating all the information into UV illustrations means that to the naked eye nothing is visible. Only with the use of a UV torch can the visitor explore the space and discover facts and stories about the equipment hidden all over the floor. Thus placing the visitor in the mindset of this curious, imaginative child and forcing them to search around.


Trapped in Suburbia award

Gold | 2010 European Design Awards
Silver | 2010 International Design Awards

Jaap Drupsteen – Designer | Explorer

To celebrate fifty-years as a practicing designer, Museum Hilversum held a retrospective exhibition on the work of Jaap Drupsteen. The exhibition showcases Jaap Drupsteen fruitful career and divides this into three sections.

The top floor presents his early audiovisual design (VPRO, Hadimassa etc) and printed objects (money, passport etc). Being a designer for screen, Drupsteen naturally starts working on black, hence the visitor enters a completely black space displaying only video work. After this the visitors moves to white – print work. Also on show are the original title rolls, all made by hand, inspiring a scrolling intro wall.

Since the exhibition features a large amount of video work a special audio system, the Sennheiser guidePORT, is used.  With the headphones on the user walks towards a screen or into a particular area and the audio is automatically heard. This prevents multiple audio tracks clashing and turning the exhibition space into musical chaos.

The Music Theatre is the second floor and displays many of Drupsteen’s theatre productions he created specifically for television. To create these unusual and inventive productions he became revolutionary in his use of chroma keying – the blue/green screen effect. To demonstrate this the visitor can experience live chroma keying by standing in a blue screen area and magically being positioned into one of Drupsteen’s works.

The lower floor presents his most recent work through two large scale projections. These are audiovisual compositions created for DJ and orchestral visuals and use a software developed by Drupsteen himself to achieve a perfect sync between image and sound.

Graphic Happiness – 100 Years of Dutch Graphic Design

Graphic Happiness consists of a publication, traveling exhibition and educational programme covering 100 years of Dutch graphic design. Travelling through China the exhibition showed work of over 60 designers highlighting their love of design.

A key part of the exhibition is the ball pit, which symbolises that the Netherlands lies below sea level. Due to the historic struggle with water, the Dutch had to be extremely inventive for hundreds of centuries. They had to design their environment in order to survive. From this necessity comes the Dutch theory that everything can be designed and forms the base to the distinctive, playful and clear Dutch design that is world-renowned. Each blue ball shows a portrait of a legendary Dutch designer or one of their designs so you can literally dive into Dutch design history.

The exhibition shows the work of over 60 designers and shows their love and passion for graphic design. Design is what makes these designers happy. It also bring the two countries, China and the Netherlands together, in an exchange of design knowledge and culture.

Based on the Chinese symbol of ‘double happiness’ and the Dutch flag (red, white and blue) the logo symbolises the two countries uniting in design. The logo is divided and produced as three different straps, which hold together the exhibition furniture and bind the publication. The logo is literally and metaphorically the binding factor in the whole design.

The flat pack furniture construction in combination with the strap fixtures provided an easily assembled solution for a travelling exhibit.


Trapped in Suburbia award
Silver | 2013 International Design Awards
Bronze | 2013 Hiiibrand Design Award

Grafisch Geluk

Grafisch Geluk (Graphic Happiness) presents 100 years of Dutch graphic design. It showcases the work of Wim Crouwel, Dick Bruna, Anthon Beeke, Otto Treuman and many more. The exhibition looks into designers trying to find happiness in their work, in graphic design.

Outside of design many people search for happiness in Las Vegas. The city has become synonymous with the idea. Inspired by the signs of Las Vegas the complete exhibition signage system is made from light boxes, turning the space into a dazzling display of iconic work and literally illuminating design history.

All the signage is black and white not to conflict with the vast array of colourful work on show.


Trapped in Suburbia award

Silver | 2012 International Design Awards

Design it Yourself

Design It Yourself is an interactive exhibition at the MOTI in Breda. In the exhibition both children and adults are challenged to work as designers. There are different elements for them to design such as: a magazine cover, a stop motion animation, a T-shirt or an icon.

Stop We Have Motion

A race against time to make a stop motion animation with all the moveable elements in the space. A camera positioned above captures the action below.

On The Cover

Again using the moveable objects but this time to make a magazine cover. This larger than life cover even allows the visitor to be part of their design. Similar a camera captures the final design.

Design-O-Mat

This pictogram drawing contest machine works like a slot machine and gives a randomised obscure assignment. For example, “design a pictogram for: a swimming pool, for hamsters, in the desert” or “a parking lot, for annoying people, with humour.”

All the results are published on the Design it Yourself website so the visitor can always check their designs after and share it with friends.


Trapped in Suburbia award

Silver | 2012 International Design Awards
Finalist | 2012 European Design Awards